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Guys Just Fucking Love Tungsten

Tungsten is one of the densest metals and one of the coolest metals I have ever experienced. Austin dropped 4k on a gigantic Tungsten cube, and it was the ultimate guys being dudes moment. Tungsten is a fascinating.

The free element is remarkable for its robustness, especially the fact that it has the highest melting point of all known elements barring carbon (which sublimes at normal pressure), melting at 3,422 °C (6,192 °F; 3,695 K). It also has the highest boiling point, at 5,930 °C (10,706 °F; 6,203 K).[11] Its density is 19.30 grams per cubic centimetre (0.697 lb/cu in),[12] comparable with that of uranium and gold, and much higher (about 1.7 times) than that of lead. (source

The crazy thing is that when you hold it, it feels so goddamn weird because nothing in those dimensions would have ever been that heavy. That cube is the same weight as a 50 lb dumbell and HEAVIER than a 45 lb plate. When you pick up the cube, the force that is pulling the cube toward the ground almost feels magnetic or supernatural. It feels like someone is pushing down on the cube. The gravity is so abnormal it literally messes with your brain. It is the most metal piece of metal; the origin of the stuff in its name is so metal. 

(source) The name "tungsten" (which means "heavy stone" in Swedish and was the old Swedish name for the mineral scheelite and other minerals of similar density.) is used in English, French, and many other languages as the name of the element, but "wolfram" (or "volfram") is used in most European (especially Germanic, Spanish and Slavic) languages and is derived from the mineral wolframite, which is the origin of the chemical symbol W.[17] The name "wolframite" is derived from German "wolf rahm" ("wolf soot" or "wolf cream"), the name given to tungsten by Johan Gottschalk Wallerius in 1747. This, in turn, derives from Latin "lupi spuma", the name Georg Agricola used for the element in 1546, which translates into English as "wolf's froth" and is a reference to the large amounts of tin consumed by the mineral during its extraction, as though the mineral devoured it like a wolf.[8] This naming follows a tradition of colorful names miners from the Ore Mountains would give various minerals, out of a superstition that certain ones that looked as if they contained then-known valuable metals but didn't were somehow "hexed". Cobalt (c.f. Kobold), pitchblende (c.f. German "blenden" for "to blind" or "to deceive") and nickel (c.f. "Old Nick") derive their names from the same miner's idiom.

This is 100% what Thor's hammer is made of. Lifting the cube off the table is literally impossible. The Cube is so awe-inspiring that my first reaction to seeing it was, "We should worship it." The Cube is extremely enthralling. If I was a billionaire, I would buy a whole gym that had all the equipment made of tungsten. Lifting with that dense metal definitely has some otherworldly effects.

             
             

Man has always been enthralled with heavy stones. There has been a historical fascination with heavy stones dating back to Prehistory. You weren't allowed to work on a Viking boat unless you lifted a heavy ass stone. 

Behind the Legend: The great Norse seamen of their day—known as pugnacious warriors, intrepid explorers and skilled traders—sailed the globe, sometimes requiring ships to be removed from water and transported over land to more navigable seas. One method Vikings used to ensure a stalwart crew? Stone lifting. To earn respect, a Viking seafarer was required to lift a stone weighing more than 340 pounds.

Tungsten is an all-powerful element and we should just worship cubes of Tungsten.