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Shocking: Did Dave Portnoy Lie About Witnessing A Carjacking During His Chicago Pizza Review?

CWB - A video review of a Loop restaurant’s pizza went viral Friday evening after the clip’s host, Barstool Sports founder Dave Portnoy, reported that his cameraman inadvertently captured footage of a carjacking that took place behind him.

It’s a fun story — and the pizza looks delicious — but Chicago police say there was no carjacking. But someone did steal a parked car and crash into a CPD cruiser.

About 5 minutes, 50 seconds into Portnoy’s colorfully-languaged review, viewers hear a crash and tires squealing. As the camera pans right, officers are seen climbing into a Chicago Police Department Transit Unit squad car that’s parked in the street.

“Did that guy get carjacked?” Portnoy asks. “That guy just got carjacked?”

“I think the guy just hit the police car,” another man on the video says.

Police are seen in the background talking with the apparent victim.

“We just had a live carjacking,” a stunned Portnoy tells viewers.

Well, not quite, according to Chicago police.

After seeing the video, we asked CPD if they had any information about the incident. They did.

It all happened around 1:40 p.m. Wednesday in the 700 block of South State Street.

According to a CPD spokesperson, a 27-year-old man parked his car in a garage on the first block of East 8th Street and later saw his vehicle parked on the street with another man behind the wheel.

That’s where the video picks up.

The car’s owner flagged down a passing police unit to get help. When the cops stopped, the guy inside the victim’s car sped away, struck the squad car, and fled westbound on Polk Street, police said. No injuries were reported.

“This incident is NOT a vehicular hijacking,” we were told, “it’s a motor vehicle theft.”

Carjacking, or “vehicular hijacking” as it’s officially known, involves robbing a victim of their vehicle. The offender must use force or threaten to use force against the victim to gain control of the vehicle for a crime to be a carjacking.

Stealing a car through non-violent means, like if the keys are left inside or it’s left running, or you take it by stealing keys from a valet box, is “only” auto theft.

There goes Pres again, slandering the good name of the City of Chicago. 

Blasting fake news that Spider caught a live carjacking in process during one of his pizza reviews last week. For all the world to see. And judge.

It wasn't a carjacking guys. It was a motor vehicle theft.  The guy on video just stole a parked car and crashed into a police car.

There is a huge difference.

So please get it right or keep your mouth shut. Have a little respect for the truth.

“This incident is NOT a vehicular hijacking,” we were told, “it’s a motor vehicle theft.”

Carjacking, or “vehicular hijacking” as it’s officially known, involves robbing a victim of their vehicle. The offender must use force or threaten to use force against the victim to gain control of the vehicle for a crime to be a carjacking.

Got it? 

If your car is stolen when you're not in it it's just silly old motor vehicle theft. Such as this case. 

If you get pistol-whipped by a 15-year-old and who knows the state can't prosecute him and Kim Foxx's office will just drop the charges immediately, and you're removed from your vehicle THAT is a carjacking. 

Capisce?

 Stop dragging this city's name through the mud with misinformation and character assassination. 

p.s. - 

Now, many people are wondering why the cops didn’t speed off in pursuit of the stolen car. Answer: They aren’t allowed to do that.

Chicago Police Department General Order G03-03-01 states, “members will not engage in a motor vehicle pursuit whenever the most serious offense wanted for is a…theft (including Possession of Stolen Motor Vehicles).”

In fact, Chicago police are specifically told that the department will never punish them for not pursuing another vehicle.

Take a bow Lori and Kim (Foxx). Awesome stuff.