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Hipster Spends $4 Million On House Made Entirely Of Shipping Containers

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Source - Over two decades as a restaurateur, Joe Carroll has incorporated odds and ends from salvage yards into his Brooklyn eateries.

Carroll, a 47-year-old New Jersey native whose popular restaurants and nightspots include barbecue joint Fette Sau and beer bar Spuyten Duyvil, didn’t think about crafting his own house from upcycled building blocks until the early 2000s, when he read about area houses made from decommissioned shipping containers.

“We wanted to have a rough-and-tumble kind of space, but still cozy and homey,” Carroll says. “Not too elegant or highbrow, because that doesn’t suit who we are — we wanted something funkier and less precious.”

It all started in 2009, when Carroll and Barbour discovered a lot on Monitor’s corner with Richardson Street. They closed on it in 2010 for $699,999. 

The architects intentionally left the nicks and dents acquired during the containers’ world travels. “Some of the scars of their previous history are very welcome,” Tolla says. “You see the different blues and red of the original containers [on the facade]. We wanted to leave those layers, but we painted some of it brown — a play on a brownstone.”

Finally, in 2013, 18 containers — some $3,000 apiece — traveled from Port Elizabeth, NJ, via flatbed truck and were stacked on the site over just four days. Construction costs were $4 million.

There is one downside to a house made largely of steel: The floors can be cold to bare feet. Plus, it attracts attention from passersby and design aficionados who make the trek to ogle the facade. “Architects, students or people who are interested in building with containers come by a couple times a week,” says Carroll. “Sometimes I let them in.”

Only in New York City would this be an acceptable way to spend four-million dollars. Any other place in the country and you’ll get laughed out of town. I have to admit, the house is nice, but it’s made from trash. And it’s not even local trash, they shipped it in from all over the world. The overall tone of the article is so pedantic that it drives me nuts. You can’t claim to be ecofriendly AND live in a mansion. The worst part is that they actually believe what they’re saying.

“We wanted to have a rough-and-tumble kind of space, but still cozy and homey,” Carroll says. “Not too elegant or highbrow, because that doesn’t suit who we are — we wanted something funkier and less precious.”

Nothing says rough and tumble common folk like a five-thousand square foot mansion in the center of the priciest real estate market in the country.  Look at these pictures!

If this is what sacrificing for the environment looks like then count me in. Flat screen TV’s, Dr. Evil style fire places. Who knew being green cold be so sexy? The only downside, other than the aforementioned cold feet, would be the homeless. They gravitate towards shipping containers like a fly to shit. I trust the Carroll’s have some sort of electric fence to keep them at bay. The rich have little patience when it comes to poors. Although based on the location of the property, they shouldn’t have any problems.