Advertisement

UCLA QB Josh Rosen Says "Football and School Don't Go Together"

Screen Shot 2017-08-08 at 10.37.30 AMScreen Shot 2017-08-08 at 10.37.25 AM

via Bleacher Report-

B/R: Look at the bright side: You got a chance to heal, maybe catch up on school.

Rosen: Don’t get me started. I love school, but it’s hard. It’s cool because we’re learning more applicable stuff in my major (Economics)—not just the prerequisite stuff that’s designed to filter out people. But football really dents my ability to take some classes that I need. There are a bunch of classes that are only offered one time. There was a class this spring I had to take, but there was a conflict with spring football, so…

B/R: So football wins out?

Rosen: Well, you can say that.

B/R: So that’s reality for student-athletes playing at a major university?

Rosen: I didn’t say that, you did. (Laughs.) Look, football and school don’t go together. They just don’t. Trying to do both is like trying to do two full-time jobs. There are guys who have no business being in school, but they’re here because this is the path to the NFL. There’s no other way. Then there’s the other side that says raise the SAT eligibility requirements. OK, raise the SAT requirement at Alabama and see what kind of team they have. You lose athletes and then the product on the field suffers.

SOUND THE ALARM!

Screen Shot 2017-08-08 at 10.33.43 AM

Breaking News.  Football and school don’t go together.  A major D1 program’s football schedule and a full college course load don’t mix great.  Can you believe it?  I mean, they’re “student-athletes”!!

I know that’s the pull quote and it instantly brings to mind the G.O.A.T of “school stinks” arguments:

Screen Shot 2017-08-08 at 10.33.00 AM

But this is actually an incredibly honest and insightful interview answer from Josh Rosen.   And it’s absolutely worth hearing his entire response in full.

B/R: Wait, some players shouldn’t be in school?

Rosen: It’s not that they shouldn’t be in school. Human beings don’t belong in school with our schedules. No one in their right mind should have a football player’s schedule, and go to school. It’s not that some players shouldn’t be in school; it’s just that universities should help them more—instead of just finding ways to keep them eligible.

Any time any player puts into school will take away from the time they could put into football. They don’t realize that they’re getting screwed until it’s too late. You have a bunch of people at the universities who are supposed to help you out, and they’re more interested in helping you stay eligible. At some point, universities have to do more to prepare players for university life and help them succeed beyond football. There’s so much money being made in this sport. It’s a crime to not do everything you can to help the people who are making it for those who are spending it.

B/R: But those same players go make money in the NFL after being prepared by their college programs.

Rosen: Some do, absolutely. What about those who don’t? What did they get for laying their body on the line play after play while universities make millions upon millions? People criticize when guys leave early for the NFL draft, and then rip them when some guys who leave early don’t get drafted. [They say,] “Why did you leave school if you weren’t going to get drafted?” I’ll tell you why: Because for a lot of guys, there is no other option. They were either leaving early (for the NFL) or flunking out. To me, that’s a problem within the system and the way we’re preparing student-athletes for the future away from football. Everyone has to be part of the process.

Rosen: If I wanted to graduate in three years, I’d just get a sociology degree. I want to get my MBA. I want to create my own business. When I’m finished with football, I want a seamless transition to life and work and what I’ve dreamed about doing all my life. I want to own the world. Every young person should be able to have that dream and the ability to access it. I don’t think that’s too much to ask.

If anything I would have focused on a much better quote from the interview: A low key savage Clemson burn.

B/R: How is it, then, that some guys graduate in three years? Deshaun Watson graduated in three years from Clemson. So did his roommate, Artavis Scott.

Rosen: I’m not knocking what those guys accomplished. They should be applauded for that. But certain schools are easier than others.

Clemson’s response:

Screen Shot 2017-08-08 at 10.38.35 AMScreen Shot 2017-08-08 at 10.38.40 AMScreen Shot 2017-08-08 at 10.38.45 AM